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Towards an International Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development

Unesco Most Programme - Thu, 05/25/2017 - 14:14
decadevc_typo_news.jpg © UNESCO

Stakeholders meeting at the UN Ocean Conference (New York, 5-9 June) will be calling for 2021-2030 be declared the International Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development. UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) invites all interested parties to work together on the development of this initiative and contribute to the creation of a broad solutions-oriented plan of actions towards “The Ocean We Need for the Future We Want”.

The United Nations’ First World Ocean Assessment found that much of the ocean is now seriously degraded and many fear there has been a global failure to integrate scientific evidence into the sustainable management of our oceans. Achieving the Sustainable Development Goal 14 will require science-based solutions and their transformation into informed policies and decisions.

The International Decade of Ocean Science will help increase public awareness about the urgent need for new science and the use of existing science to increase our understanding of the cumulative impacts affecting our oceans. The goal is to build, through a global partnership and co-designed approach, stronger cooperation between the different bodies responsible for ocean science while facilitating a more efficient delivery of knowledge to decision-makers.

UNESCO’s IOC has put formally forward the International Decade of Ocean Science proposal as its major voluntary commitment to The UN Ocean Conference. The commitment is a rallying point and an open invitation to governments, intergovernmental organizations and other interested stakeholders wishing to support and contribute to the initiative and help turn the initial ideas into a broad plan of concerted actions with shared goals and responsibilities.

The Ocean Decade could have five main objectives:

· Stimulate a global partnership on the marine science requirements needed to support implementation of Agenda 2030;

· Understand the impacts of cumulative stressors and seek sustainable solutions for sustaining benefits from the ocean;

· Share knowledge and enhance interdisciplinary marine research capacities through the transfer of marine technology, leading to economic benefits for all Member States, particularly for Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Least Developed Countries;

· Gain a better quantitative knowledge of ocean dynamics, ecosystems and their contribution to society, through the whole ocean column, from the surface to the bottom, and from the perspective of both natural and anthropogenic forcing;

· Map the ocean floor and its resources to support their sustainable management.

The Decade proposal will be forwarded to the UN General Assembly later in the fall of 2017 for its consideration. Several activities are planned over the next three years in order to prepare the International Decade for Ocean Science. These deliverables include the establishment of global and regional coordination mechanisms, the definition of an international research framework for ocean science, the creation of data-sharing and capacity development projects worldwide as well as the establishment of a global communications programme.

All details related to The International Decade for Ocean Science Voluntary commitment can be found on The Ocean Conference Registry of Voluntary Commitments alongside other commitments undertaken by Governments, international organizations, civil society organizations, the private sector, scientific institutions and other stakeholders toward the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14 – to conserve and sustainable use our ocean.

For a fun introduction to the International Decade of Ocean Science initiative, see this video produced by Stein by Oosteren (Dutch attaché to UNESCO).

Visit the UNESCO dedicated webpage for The Ocean Conference for a comprehensive view of the programme, our side events, and voluntary commitments.

For more information, please contact:

Julian Barbière (j.barbiere(at)unesco.org), for information about the International Decade of Ocean Science and the participation of UNESCO’s IOC at The UN Ocean Conference.

Categories: News

Family learning approach boosts literacy, numeracy and language skills in Mozambique

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:47
mozambique.jpg © UNESCO

Children, youth and adults from the Boane district in Mozambique are improving their literacy, numeracy and language skills thanks to a family learning approach developed by UNESCO.

In Boane district, 57.8% of women and 30.1% of men are illiterate, according to the 2014-2015 Household Budget Survey (Inquérito de Orçamento Familiar 2014-2015), rendering them unable to fully participate in their communities or expand their life opportunities.

To address this, since 2015, the UNESCO Maputo office has implemented a project called “Integrated approach to literacy and adult education to empower young women and their families through learning in rural and peri-urban communities in Mozambique”, with support from the UNESCO Malala Fund for Girls’ Right to Education.

The project targets 13 communities from the Boane, Eráti and Memba districts using an innovative  approach that focuses on intergenerational interactions within families and communities and recognizes the important role that parents, grandparents and other caregivers play in their children’s education. 

Family Learning Manual

As part of the project, a Family Learning Manual has been produced. From 3-5 April 2017, the UNESCO Maputo Office, in coordination with the Ministry of Education and Human Development, tested the first module of the manual which focuses on health and nutrition. The testing aimed to evaluate the applicability of the manual (contents, activities, pedagogical material and approach) and to develop the knowledge and skills of facilitators and literacy teachers through the manual.

About 38 children enrolled in the Early Childhood Programme and their parents (11 women and 1 man) from the Mavoco Community, a peri-urban area of Boane District, benefited from the testing. Fernanda Isac, a learner, said: “My son enjoyed attending class with me and learning about the structure of our family. After the lessons, he asked me for a pen so we could do the homework together”. 

The testing underlined the key role that facilitators and literacy educators play in sensitizing and mobilizing the community. Noé André Simbine, a learning facilitator, said: “Through this manual, parents are learning about the importance of accompanying their children throughout the learning process”.

The results from the testing will be used for the final version of the Family Learning Manual, which will be used to train facilitators in July 2017 in the three pilot districts of Eráti, Boane and Memba. 

Categories: News

Family learning approach boosts literacy, numeracy and language skills in Mozambique

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:47
mozambique.jpg © UNESCO

Children, youth and adults from the Boane district in Mozambique are improving their literacy, numeracy and language skills thanks to a family learning approach developed by UNESCO.

In Boane district, 57.8% of women and 30.1% of men are illiterate, according to the 2014-2015 Household Budget Survey (Inquérito de Orçamento Familiar 2014-2015), rendering them unable to fully participate in their communities or expand their life opportunities.

To address this, since 2015, the UNESCO Maputo office has implemented a project called “Integrated approach to literacy and adult education to empower young women and their families through learning in rural and peri-urban communities in Mozambique”, with support from the UNESCO Malala Fund for Girls’ Right to Education.

The project targets 13 communities from the Boane, Eráti and Memba districts using an innovative  approach that focuses on intergenerational interactions within families and communities and recognizes the important role that parents, grandparents and other caregivers play in their children’s education. 

Family Learning Manual

As part of the project, a Family Learning Manual has been produced. From 3-5 April 2017, the UNESCO Maputo Office, in coordination with the Ministry of Education and Human Development, tested the first module of the manual which focuses on health and nutrition. The testing aimed to evaluate the applicability of the manual (contents, activities, pedagogical material and approach) and to develop the knowledge and skills of facilitators and literacy teachers through the manual.

About 38 children enrolled in the Early Childhood Programme and their parents (11 women and 1 man) from the Mavoco Community, a peri-urban area of Boane District, benefited from the testing. Fernanda Isac, a learner, said: “My son enjoyed attending class with me and learning about the structure of our family. After the lessons, he asked me for a pen so we could do the homework together”. 

The testing underlined the key role that facilitators and literacy educators play in sensitizing and mobilizing the community. Noé André Simbine, a learning facilitator, said: “Through this manual, parents are learning about the importance of accompanying their children throughout the learning process”.

The results from the testing will be used for the final version of the Family Learning Manual, which will be used to train facilitators in July 2017 in the three pilot districts of Eráti, Boane and Memba. 

Categories: News

Family learning approach boosts literacy, numeracy and language skills in Mozambique

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:47
mozambique.jpg © UNESCO

Children, youth and adults from the Boane district in Mozambique are improving their literacy, numeracy and language skills thanks to a family learning approach developed by UNESCO.

In Boane district, 57.8% of women and 30.1% of men are illiterate, according to the 2014-2015 Household Budget Survey (Inquérito de Orçamento Familiar 2014-2015), rendering them unable to fully participate in their communities or expand their life opportunities.

To address this, since 2015, the UNESCO Maputo office has implemented a project called “Integrated approach to literacy and adult education to empower young women and their families through learning in rural and peri-urban communities in Mozambique”, with support from the UNESCO Malala Fund for Girls’ Right to Education.

The project targets 13 communities from the Boane, Eráti and Memba districts using an innovative  approach that focuses on intergenerational interactions within families and communities and recognizes the important role that parents, grandparents and other caregivers play in their children’s education. 

Family Learning Manual

As part of the project, a Family Learning Manual has been produced. From 3-5 April 2017, the UNESCO Maputo Office, in coordination with the Ministry of Education and Human Development, tested the first module of the manual which focuses on health and nutrition. The testing aimed to evaluate the applicability of the manual (contents, activities, pedagogical material and approach) and to develop the knowledge and skills of facilitators and literacy teachers through the manual.

About 38 children enrolled in the Early Childhood Programme and their parents (11 women and 1 man) from the Mavoco Community, a peri-urban area of Boane District, benefited from the testing. Fernanda Isac, a learner, said: “My son enjoyed attending class with me and learning about the structure of our family. After the lessons, he asked me for a pen so we could do the homework together”. 

The testing underlined the key role that facilitators and literacy educators play in sensitizing and mobilizing the community. Noé André Simbine, a learning facilitator, said: “Through this manual, parents are learning about the importance of accompanying their children throughout the learning process”.

The results from the testing will be used for the final version of the Family Learning Manual, which will be used to train facilitators in July 2017 in the three pilot districts of Eráti, Boane and Memba. 

Categories: News

Family learning approach boosts literacy, numeracy and language skills in Mozambique

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:47
mozambique.jpg © UNESCO

Children, youth and adults from the Boane district in Mozambique are improving their literacy, numeracy and language skills thanks to a family learning approach developed by UNESCO.

In Boane district, 57.8% of women and 30.1% of men are illiterate, according to the 2014-2015 Household Budget Survey (Inquérito de Orçamento Familiar 2014-2015), rendering them unable to fully participate in their communities or expand their life opportunities.

To address this, since 2015, the UNESCO Maputo office has implemented a project called “Integrated approach to literacy and adult education to empower young women and their families through learning in rural and peri-urban communities in Mozambique”, with support from the UNESCO Malala Fund for Girls’ Right to Education.

The project targets 13 communities from the Boane, Eráti and Memba districts using an innovative  approach that focuses on intergenerational interactions within families and communities and recognizes the important role that parents, grandparents and other caregivers play in their children’s education. 

Family Learning Manual

As part of the project, a Family Learning Manual has been produced. From 3-5 April 2017, the UNESCO Maputo Office, in coordination with the Ministry of Education and Human Development, tested the first module of the manual which focuses on health and nutrition. The testing aimed to evaluate the applicability of the manual (contents, activities, pedagogical material and approach) and to develop the knowledge and skills of facilitators and literacy teachers through the manual.

About 38 children enrolled in the Early Childhood Programme and their parents (11 women and 1 man) from the Mavoco Community, a peri-urban area of Boane District, benefited from the testing. Fernanda Isac, a learner, said: “My son enjoyed attending class with me and learning about the structure of our family. After the lessons, he asked me for a pen so we could do the homework together”. 

The testing underlined the key role that facilitators and literacy educators play in sensitizing and mobilizing the community. Noé André Simbine, a learning facilitator, said: “Through this manual, parents are learning about the importance of accompanying their children throughout the learning process”.

The results from the testing will be used for the final version of the Family Learning Manual, which will be used to train facilitators in July 2017 in the three pilot districts of Eráti, Boane and Memba. 

Categories: News

Madrid conference highlights the importance of protecting cultural diversity for peacebuilding in the Middle East

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:19
dg-madrid-conf-infocus-drupal.jpg © UNESCO

On 24 May, UNESCO Director-General, Irina Bokova, addressed the Conference: Victims of ethnic and religious violence in the Middle East, in Madrid, Spain. The event took place in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Spain, Sr Alfonso Maria Dastis Quecedo, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Mr Ayman H. Safadi and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Iraq, Dr Ibrahim Al-Jaafari.

The Conference is a follow up to the public debate held by the UN Security Council on 27 March 2015 and the Conference held in Paris on 8 September 2015, on the victims of ethnic and religious violence in the Middle East. At the Paris Conference, an Action Plan was presented which set forth a roadmap for the international community to support those who are persecuted for ethnical or religious reasons. The aim of the Madrid Conference was to take stock of actions taken and to determine most urgent priorities as well as identifying programs, projects and actions to enable displaced populations to return and to foster reconciliation and stabilization.

All participants stressed the need to protect cultural heritage and cultural diversity in the region, and teach about tolerance and coexistence in schools, learning to live together, and protecting victims of  ethnic and religious violence. 

Ms Nadia Murad, speaking for the Yezidi community, called for urgent mobilization and protection of all communities in the Middle East, "we have no voice, we need the support of the international community," she told the audience.

“Violent extremists target both heritage and human lives -- they target victims and minorities from all backgrounds, Shebak, Turkmen, Yezidis, Muslims, Christians…, as symbols of the pluralism they abhor,” declared the Director-General. "Violent extremists target schools, because they know the power of knowledge to counter their rhetoric drawing on false visions of faith and history, they destroy culture, because they know it can foster dialogue and help people live together in their diversity," She added.

“We need “hard power” to respond, we need “soft power” to prevent, through education, culture and information. This is the role of UNESCO and the goal of the United Nations, its Counter-Terrorism Strategy in support of Member States."

 “This is the message I shared at the Arab-Islamic-American Summit last week in Riyadh on the prevention of violent extremism,” said the Director-General. “This is also the message embedded in the Paris Plan of Action."

The Director-General highlighted the importance of teaching peace and providing people with the skills to overcome mistrust and division, and to build dialogue. This underpins all of UNESCO’s action to prevent violent extremism through emergency education and the protection of heritage. UNESCO proposed the launch of a regional initiative to teach about the history of cultural diversity in schools in the Middle East, to foster intercultural skills and inclusive citizenship. This initiative will also highlight cultural diversity in safeguarding and restoration process of historical cities in the region. 

In his opening remarks, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Spain declared: "Violent extremism cannot be associated with any culture or religion. We are here to express our solidarity with the victims and to reiterate our determination to act." The Minister urged all participants to contribute to the UNESCO Emergency Fund for the Protection of Heritage, in order to restore, as a priority, religious heritage of shared interest, like the Nabi Yunus Shrine in Mosul, which is revered by all monotheism, as a driver of unity and dialogue.  

Categories: News

Madrid conference highlights the importance of protecting cultural diversity for peacebuilding in the Middle East

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:19
dg-madrid-conf-infocus.jpg © UNESCO

On 24 May, UNESCO Director-General, Irina Bokova, addressed the Conference: Victims of ethnic and religious violence in the Middle East, in Madrid, Spain. The event took place in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Spain, Sr Alfonso Maria Dastis Quecedo, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Mr Ayman H. Safadi and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Iraq, Dr Ibrahim Al-Jaafari.

The Conference is a follow up to the public debate held by the UN Security Council on 27 March 2015 and the Conference held in Paris on 8 September 2015, on the victims of ethnic and religious violence in the Middle East. At the Paris Conference, an Action Plan was presented which set forth a roadmap for the international community to support those who are persecuted for ethnical or religious reasons. The aim of the Madrid Conference was to take stock of actions taken and to determine most urgent priorities as well as identifying programs, projects and actions to enable displaced populations to return and to foster reconciliation and stabilization.

All participants stressed the need to protect cultural heritage and cultural diversity in the region, and teach about tolerance and coexistence in schools, learning to live together, and protecting victims of  ethnic and religious violence. 

Ms Nadia Murad, speaking for the Yezidi community, called for urgent mobilization and protection of all communities in the Middle East, "we have no voice, we need the support of the international community," she told the audience.

“Violent extremists target both heritage and human lives -- they target victims and minorities from all backgrounds, Shebak, Turkmen, Yezidis, Muslims, Christians…, as symbols of the pluralism they abhor,” declared the Director-General. "Violent extremists target schools, because they know the power of knowledge to counter their rhetoric drawing on false visions of faith and history, they destroy culture, because they know it can foster dialogue and help people live together in their diversity," She added.

“We need “hard power” to respond, we need “soft power” to prevent, through education, culture and information. This is the role of UNESCO and the goal of the United Nations, its Counter-Terrorism Strategy in support of Member States."

 “This is the message I shared at the Arab-Islamic-American Summit last week in Riyadh on the prevention of violent extremism,” said the Director-General. “This is also the message embedded in the Paris Plan of Action."

The Director-General highlighted the importance of teaching peace and providing people with the skills to overcome mistrust and division, and to build dialogue. “This underpins all of UNESCO’s action to prevent violent extremism through emergency education and the protection of heritage. UNESCO proposed the launch of a regional initiative to teach about the history of cultural diversity in schools in the Middle East, to foster intercultural skills and inclusive citizenship. This initiative will also highlight cultural diversity in safeguarding and restoration process of historical cities in the region. 

In his opening remarks, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Spain declared: "Violent extremism cannot be associated with any culture or religion. We are here to express our solidarity with the victims and to reiterate our determination to act." The Minister urged all participants to contribute to the UNESCO Emergency Fund for the Protection of Heritage, in order to restore, as a priority, religious heritage of shared interest, like the Nabi Yunus Shrine in Mosul, which is revered by all monotheism, as a driver of unity and dialogue.  

Categories: News

Madrid conference highlights the importance of protecting cultural diversity for peacebuilding in the Middle East

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:19
dg-madrid-conf-infocus-drupal.jpg © UNESCO

On 24 May, UNESCO Director-General, Irina Bokova, addressed the Conference: Victims of ethnic and religious violence in the Middle East, in Madrid, Spain. The event took place in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Spain, Sr Alfonso Maria Dastis Quecedo, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Mr Ayman H. Safadi and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Iraq, Dr Ibrahim Al-Jaafari.

The Conference is a follow up to the public debate held by the UN Security Council on 27 March 2015 and the Conference held in Paris on 8 September 2015, on the victims of ethnic and religious violence in the Middle East. At the Paris Conference, an Action Plan was presented which set forth a roadmap for the international community to support those who are persecuted for ethnical or religious reasons. The aim of the Madrid Conference was to take stock of actions taken and to determine most urgent priorities as well as identifying programs, projects and actions to enable displaced populations to return and to foster reconciliation and stabilization.

All participants stressed the need to protect cultural heritage and cultural diversity in the region, and teach about tolerance and coexistence in schools, learning to live together, and protecting victims of  ethnic and religious violence. 

Ms Nadia Murad, speaking for the Yezidi community, called for urgent mobilization and protection of all communities in the Middle East, "we have no voice, we need the support of the international community," she told the audience.

“Violent extremists target both heritage and human lives -- they target victims and minorities from all backgrounds, Shebak, Turkmen, Yezidis, Muslims, Christians…, as symbols of the pluralism they abhor,” declared the Director-General. "Violent extremists target schools, because they know the power of knowledge to counter their rhetoric drawing on false visions of faith and history, they destroy culture, because they know it can foster dialogue and help people live together in their diversity," She added.

“We need “hard power” to respond, we need “soft power” to prevent, through education, culture and information. This is the role of UNESCO and the goal of the United Nations, its Counter-Terrorism Strategy in support of Member States."

 “This is the message I shared at the Arab-Islamic-American Summit last week in Riyadh on the prevention of violent extremism,” said the Director-General. “This is also the message embedded in the Paris Plan of Action."

The Director-General highlighted the importance of teaching peace and providing people with the skills to overcome mistrust and division, and to build dialogue. This underpins all of UNESCO’s action to prevent violent extremism through emergency education and the protection of heritage. UNESCO proposed the launch of a regional initiative to teach about the history of cultural diversity in schools in the Middle East, to foster intercultural skills and inclusive citizenship. This initiative will also highlight cultural diversity in safeguarding and restoration process of historical cities in the region. 

In his opening remarks, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Spain declared: "Violent extremism cannot be associated with any culture or religion. We are here to express our solidarity with the victims and to reiterate our determination to act." The Minister urged all participants to contribute to the UNESCO Emergency Fund for the Protection of Heritage, in order to restore, as a priority, religious heritage of shared interest, like the Nabi Yunus Shrine in Mosul, which is revered by all monotheism, as a driver of unity and dialogue.  

Categories: News

Madrid conference highlights the importance of protecting cultural diversity for peacebuilding in the Middle East

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:19
dg-madrid-conf-infocus.jpg © UNESCO

On 24 May, UNESCO Director-General, Irina Bokova, addressed the Conference: Victims of ethnic and religious violence in the Middle East, in Madrid, Spain. The event took place in the presence of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Spain, Sr Alfonso Maria Dastis Quecedo, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Mr Ayman H. Safadi and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Iraq, Dr Ibrahim Al-Jaafari.

The Conference is a follow up to the public debate held by the UN Security Council on 27 March 2015 and the Conference held in Paris on 8 September 2015, on the victims of ethnic and religious violence in the Middle East. At the Paris Conference, an Action Plan was presented which set forth a roadmap for the international community to support those who are persecuted for ethnical or religious reasons. The aim of the Madrid Conference was to take stock of actions taken and to determine most urgent priorities as well as identifying programs, projects and actions to enable displaced populations to return and to foster reconciliation and stabilization.

All participants stressed the need to protect cultural heritage and cultural diversity in the region, and teach about tolerance and coexistence in schools, learning to live together, and protecting victims of  ethnic and religious violence. 

Ms Nadia Murad, speaking for the Yezidi community, called for urgent mobilization and protection of all communities in the Middle East, "we have no voice, we need the support of the international community," she told the audience.

“Violent extremists target both heritage and human lives -- they target victims and minorities from all backgrounds, Shebak, Turkmen, Yezidis, Muslims, Christians…, as symbols of the pluralism they abhor,” declared the Director-General. "Violent extremists target schools, because they know the power of knowledge to counter their rhetoric drawing on false visions of faith and history, they destroy culture, because they know it can foster dialogue and help people live together in their diversity," She added.

“We need “hard power” to respond, we need “soft power” to prevent, through education, culture and information. This is the role of UNESCO and the goal of the United Nations, its Counter-Terrorism Strategy in support of Member States."

 “This is the message I shared at the Arab-Islamic-American Summit last week in Riyadh on the prevention of violent extremism,” said the Director-General. “This is also the message embedded in the Paris Plan of Action."

The Director-General highlighted the importance of teaching peace and providing people with the skills to overcome mistrust and division, and to build dialogue. “This underpins all of UNESCO’s action to prevent violent extremism through emergency education and the protection of heritage. UNESCO proposed the launch of a regional initiative to teach about the history of cultural diversity in schools in the Middle East, to foster intercultural skills and inclusive citizenship. This initiative will also highlight cultural diversity in safeguarding and restoration process of historical cities in the region. 

In his opening remarks, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Spain declared: "Violent extremism cannot be associated with any culture or religion. We are here to express our solidarity with the victims and to reiterate our determination to act." The Minister urged all participants to contribute to the UNESCO Emergency Fund for the Protection of Heritage, in order to restore, as a priority, religious heritage of shared interest, like the Nabi Yunus Shrine in Mosul, which is revered by all monotheism, as a driver of unity and dialogue.  

Categories: News

Education to prevent violent extremism in West Africa and the Sahel

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:06
pve_dakar.jpg © UNESCO 24 May 2017

UNESCO (Dakar, Headquarters and IICBA), the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Centre for International Understanding (APCEIU) and the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF), represented by its Institut de la Francophonie pour l’éducation et la formation (IFEF), organized a capacity-building workshop on prevention of violent extremism through education (PVE-E) in West Africa and the Sahel. This event took place in Dakar, Senegal, from 9 to 11 May 2017.

In today’s globalized and interconnected world, the growing threats and acts of violent extremism in West Africa and the Sahel create climates of fear and insecurity, which are adversely affecting peace and development efforts. Providing young people with knowledge, skills and values for them to nurture respect for all, building a sense of belonging to a common humanity and helping them to become responsible and active citizens is critical for a more just and sustainable world.

UNESCO, APCEIU and IFEF jointly organized in Dakar, from 9 to 11 May 2017, a workshop aiming at strengthening capacities of education policy makers (Parliamentarians, Permanent Secretaries and Chiefs of Cabinet of Ministries of Education, senior officials in charge of teacher education or curricula) and senior teacher trainers to design and implement relevant and effective policies and practices that contribute to prevention of violent extremism (PVE) and eventually to sustainable peace in West Africa and the Sahel. About forty participants from Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, the Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal and Sierra Leone attended this workshop as well as education, PVE-E experts.

First, presentations on international and regional normative instruments as well as on security and peace situation in the West African region and the Sahel provided an overview of the context.

Then, in addition to the Clearinghouse on Global Citizenship Education (GCED) hosted by APCEIU, two tools on PVE-E developed by UNESCO were introduced: (1) a Guide on PVE for education policy makers, to support national efforts to integrate GCED into their education systems, and (2) a Teachers’ Guide on managing classroom discussions in relation to the PVE. OIF also presented the #LibresEnsemble (FreeTogether) Initiative launched to give a voice to young people to express their views on citizenship, freedom, diversity, living together, etc. through social media and education, as well as cultural, economic and artistic activities.

Building on these tools and examples of PEV-E approaches and practices in formal, non-formal and informal education settings, country delegations drafted a roadmap for integration of PVE into education policies and practices, considering the context, the needs and capacities of respective countries.

At the end of the workshop, participants expressed their commitment to reinforce advocacy amongst high-level authorities in their country, to suggest law and legal frameworks on PVE-E, to integrate PVE into education sector plans, curricula, education personnel training (formal, non-formal and informal) and to further involve communities.

The organizers will ensure follow up on recommendations by developing a platform for exchange and experience sharing, establishing an exchange network, supporting countries in ownership and adaptation of the tools developed by UNESCO and OIF (pedagogical guide and #LibresEnsemble).

"The most remarkable result is that everyone has had a prospective look. We hope that this way, national visions and strategies will gain ground and will really transform this reality. " said Mamadou Ndoye, former Minister of Education of Senegal and moderator of the workshop.

Categories: News

Education to prevent violent extremism in West Africa and the Sahel

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 11:06
pve_dakar.jpg © UNESCO 24 May 2017

UNESCO (Dakar, Headquarters and IICBA), the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Centre for International Understanding (APCEIU) and the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie (OIF), represented by its Institut de la Francophonie pour l’éducation et la formation (IFEF), organized a capacity-building workshop on prevention of violent extremism through education (PVE-E) in West Africa and the Sahel. This event took place in Dakar, Senegal, from 9 to 11 May 2017.

In today’s globalized and interconnected world, the growing threats and acts of violent extremism in West Africa and the Sahel create climates of fear and insecurity, which are adversely affecting peace and development efforts. Providing young people with knowledge, skills and values for them to nurture respect for all, building a sense of belonging to a common humanity and helping them to become responsible and active citizens is critical for a more just and sustainable world.

UNESCO, APCEIU and IFEF jointly organized in Dakar, from 9 to 11 May 2017, a workshop aiming at strengthening capacities of education policy makers (Parliamentarians, Permanent Secretaries and Chiefs of Cabinet of Ministries of Education, senior officials in charge of teacher education or curricula) and senior teacher trainers to design and implement relevant and effective policies and practices that contribute to prevention of violent extremism (PVE) and eventually to sustainable peace in West Africa and the Sahel. About forty participants from Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, the Gambia, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Senegal and Sierra Leone attended this workshop as well as education, PVE-E experts.

First, presentations on international and regional normative instruments as well as on security and peace situation in the West African region and the Sahel provided an overview of the context.

Then, in addition to the Clearinghouse on Global Citizenship Education (GCED) hosted by APCEIU, two tools on PVE-E developed by UNESCO were introduced: (1) a Guide on PVE for education policy makers, to support national efforts to integrate GCED into their education systems, and (2) a Teachers’ Guide on managing classroom discussions in relation to the PVE. OIF also presented the #LibresEnsemble (FreeTogether) Initiative launched to give a voice to young people to express their views on citizenship, freedom, diversity, living together, etc. through social media and education, as well as cultural, economic and artistic activities.

Building on these tools and examples of PEV-E approaches and practices in formal, non-formal and informal education settings, country delegations drafted a roadmap for integration of PVE into education policies and practices, considering the context, the needs and capacities of respective countries.

At the end of the workshop, participants expressed their commitment to reinforce advocacy amongst high-level authorities in their country, to suggest law and legal frameworks on PVE-E, to integrate PVE into education sector plans, curricula, education personnel training (formal, non-formal and informal) and to further involve communities.

The organizers will ensure follow up on recommendations by developing a platform for exchange and experience sharing, establishing an exchange network, supporting countries in ownership and adaptation of the tools developed by UNESCO and OIF (pedagogical guide and #LibresEnsemble).

"The most remarkable result is that everyone has had a prospective look. We hope that this way, national visions and strategies will gain ground and will really transform this reality. " said Mamadou Ndoye, former Minister of Education of Senegal and moderator of the workshop.

Categories: News

Islamic culture as a source of dialogue and peace

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 10:34
dg-king-morocco-drupal.jpg © UNESCO

On May 23 2017, UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova and His Majesty King Mohammed VI of Morocco jointly visited Al Quaraouiyine University, the oldest continually operating higher education institution in the world, within the framework of the national plan on the prevention of violent extremism through education and culture.

For nearly 20 years, Morocco has embarked on a comprehensive plan to prevent and counter violent extremism, which is based on the development of educational institutions and the training of imams to convey a moderate, open and tolerant Islam for the 21st century. The King thus created the new Mohammed VI Institute and since 2015, has placed Al Quaraouiyine University under his authority so that it may once again resume its place as a reference institution in the field of Islamic religion and civilization. These efforts are aimed at "immunizing the religious field against violent extremism and ostracism." This policy is accompanied by a vast project for the rehabilitation of madrasas, traditional Koranic schools that are an integral part of Morocco’s cultural heritage.

The Director-General and His Majesty visited together three newly renovated madrasas, reopened to students. Their rehabilitation is part of the broader renovation of the Medina of Fez, inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981.

"We certainly need ‘hard power’ to respond, but this is not enough. We also have to win the battle of ideas to prevent a threat that draws on false interpretations of faith and history. This battle is an educational and cultural battle, and UNESCO plays a central role here," said the Director-General.

"When young people are learning to hate, we must teach them peace," said Irina Bokova, underscoring that this must start on the benches of schools, including by learning about the history of Islam and its values, architecture, calligraphy and immense contribution to the history of humanity as a source of dialogue and dignity.

Morocco is the first Arab country to work with UNESCO to develop a National Strategy for the prevention of violent extremism through education. UNESCO has strengthened its programs to prevent violent extremism through education for global citizenship, combating racism and hatred, including anti-Semitism and islamophobia.

During her official visit Irina Bokova also met with Mr Ahmed Toufiq, Minister of Habous and Islamic Affairs, and Mr Said Zniber, Wali of the Fes-Meknes Region and Governor of Fez.

Categories: News

Islamic culture as a source of dialogue and peace

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 10:34
dg-king-morocco-drupal.jpg © UNESCO

On May 23 2017, UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova and His Majesty King Mohammed VI of Morocco jointly visited Al Quaraouiyine University, the oldest continually operating higher education institution in the world, within the framework of the national plan on the prevention of violent extremism through education and culture.

For nearly 20 years, Morocco has embarked on a comprehensive plan to prevent and counter violent extremism, which is based on the development of educational institutions and the training of imams to convey a moderate, open and tolerant Islam for the 21st century. The King thus created the new Mohammed VI Institute and since 2015, has placed Al Quaraouiyine University under his authority so that it may once again resume its place as a reference institution in the field of Islamic religion and civilization. These efforts are aimed at "immunizing the religious field against violent extremism and ostracism." This policy is accompanied by a vast project for the rehabilitation of madrasas, traditional Koranic schools that are an integral part of Morocco’s cultural heritage.

The Director-General and His Majesty visited together three newly renovated madrasas, reopened to students. Their rehabilitation is part of the broader renovation of the Medina of Fez, inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981.

"We certainly need ‘hard power’ to respond, but this is not enough. We also have to win the battle of ideas to prevent a threat that draws on false interpretations of faith and history. This battle is an educational and cultural battle, and UNESCO plays a central role here," said the Director-General.

"When young people are learning to hate, we must teach them peace," said Irina Bokova, underscoring that this must start on the benches of schools, including by learning about the history of Islam and its values, architecture, calligraphy and immense contribution to the history of humanity as a source of dialogue and dignity.

Morocco is the first Arab country to work with UNESCO to develop a National Strategy for the prevention of violent extremism through education. UNESCO has strengthened its programs to prevent violent extremism through education for global citizenship, combating racism and hatred, including anti-Semitism and islamophobia.

During her official visit Irina Bokova also met with Mr Ahmed Toufiq, Minister of Habous and Islamic Affairs, and Mr Said Zniber, Wali of the Fes-Meknes Region and Governor of Fez.

Categories: News

The King of Morocco Mohammed VI and the Director-General of UNESCO celebrate Islamic culture as a source of dialogue and peace

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 10:34

On May 23 2017, UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova and His Majesty King Mohammed VI of Morocco jointly visited Al Quaraouiyine University, the oldest continually operating higher education institution in the world, within the framework of the national plan on the prevention of violent extremism through education and culture.

For nearly 20 years, Morocco has embarked on a comprehensive plan to prevent and counter violent extremism, which is based on the development of educational institutions and the training of imams to convey a moderate, open and tolerant Islam for the 21st century. The King thus created the new Mohammed VI Institute and since 2015, has placed Al Quaraouiyine University under his authority so that it may once again resume its place as a reference institution in the field of Islamic religion and civilization. These efforts are aimed at "immunizing the religious field against violent extremism and ostracism." This policy is accompanied by a vast project for the rehabilitation of madrasas, traditional Koranic schools that are an integral part of Morocco’s cultural heritage.

The Director-General and His Majesty visited together three newly renovated madrasas, reopened to students. Their rehabilitation is part of the broader renovation of the Medina of Fez, inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981.

"We certainly need ‘hard power’ to respond, but this is not enough. We also have to win the battle of ideas to prevent a threat that draws on false interpretations of faith and history. This battle is an educational and cultural battle, and UNESCO plays a central role here," said the Director-General.

"When young people are learning to hate, we must teach them peace," said Irina Bokova, underscoring that this must start on the benches of schools, including by learning about the history of Islam and its values, architecture, calligraphy and immense contribution to the history of humanity as a source of dialogue and dignity.

Morocco is the first Arab country to work with UNESCO to develop a National Strategy for the prevention of violent extremism through education. UNESCO has strengthened its programs to prevent violent extremism through education for global citizenship, combating racism and hatred, including anti-Semitism and islamophobia.

During her official visit Irina Bokova also met with Mr Ahmed Toufiq, Minister of Habous and Islamic Affairs, and Mr Said Zniber, Wali of the Fes-Meknes Region and Governor of Fez.

Categories: News

Stakeholders Join their Efforts to Fight Illicit Trafficking of Cultural Property

Unesco Most Programme - Wed, 05/24/2017 - 04:09
1970-buda.png © Museum of Cultural History/UiO/Ellen C. Holte 24 May 2017
Categories: News

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